History

Abraham Lincoln in 1865, photographed by Gardner

Let Us Humbly Give Thanks …

By Nancy Spannaus Nov. 24, 2021—As the Civil War yet raged in the fall of 1863, President Abraham Lincoln decided to call for a national “day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens,” to be held on the last Thursday of November.[1]  His full […]

by November 25, 2021 0 comments Commentary, History
President McKinley's Final Address in Buffalo Before His Assassination

Today’s Supply Chain Woes: An Historical Perspective from President William McKinley

By John Ascher October 18, 2021-Hundreds of cargo ships now wait weeks at various US ports, as the impact of the Covid pandemic has created labor shortages, while simultaneously increasing consumer purchases. The globalized “just in time” system has been pushed to the brink. The Biden Administration has responded with […]

Hinton Helper's book

A Southern Voice for Complete Abolition

By Nancy Spannaus Oct. 2, 2021—Have you ever heard of Hinton Rowan Helper? Neither had I until this summer, when a friend who knew I was working on the persistence of American slavery called it to my attention. Yet the North Carolinian Helper played a prominent and some say decisive […]

by October 2, 2021 1 comment History, Slavery
A partial photo of the Oglethorpe statue in Augusta, Georgia

Investigating American Slavery: The Case of Georgia

Part II of a series {Sept. 13, 2021–The following is a draft chapter from my upcoming book, Why American Slavery Persisted.} By Nancy Spannaus It may be hard for even Georgians to believe, but the colony of Georgia was the only North American colony to prohibit slavery at its founding. […]

by September 13, 2021 0 comments History, Slavery
A depiction of slavery in the West Indies, most likely Barbados

Investigating American Slavery

By Nancy Spannaus Part 1 of a series Sept. 5, 2021—In-depth historical research always brings surprises, and my ongoing work on my upcoming class series and book on Why American Slavery Persisted is no exception.  This short post will review one of them: the Carolinas colonies were the only British […]

by September 5, 2021 2 comments History, Slavery
A Hamilton tribute at his graveside ceremony in 2018.

The Tragedy of Alexander Hamilton’s Death

By Nancy Spannaus July 11, 2021—For the second year in a row, ceremonies at the gravesite of Alexander Hamilton at Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan have had to be cancelled due to pandemic precautions. But that should not stop us from commemorating the life of this great man, and acknowledging […]

by July 11, 2021 0 comments Commentary, History
The original building of the Black college built in Petersburg under the Readjuster period.

The Readjusters: The Black-White Alliance That Once Governed Virginia

By Edward Spannaus July 9, 2021–Editor’s note: The following article was previewed on this blog in 2019, in a post entitled “New History Bulletin Introduces the ‘Readjusters,’” and subtitled “History Does Not Come in Black and White.” However, at that time, the article, published in the Bulletin of Loudoun County […]

by July 9, 2021 3 comments History, News
The devastation from the 1837 crash.

Lincoln’s Campaign for a National Bank

By Nancy Spannaus June 25, 2021—As the Whig Party geared up for the presidential elections of 1840, the United States was mired in a deep depression. While that depression had been brought on by the Jackson Administration’s dismantling of the Second Bank of the United States, there was not broad […]

by June 25, 2021 0 comments History, Infrastructure Bank
Detail of Lorenzetti's fresco Allegory of Good Government in the Town (wikimedia)

Explore the Roots of the American System

By Nancy Spannaus June 14, 2021—One of the common questions I am asked during my classes of Alexander Hamilton’s American System is: Where did Hamilton get his ideas? In a one-and-a-half-hour presentation on June 6, I addressed that question at some length. My power point presentation was entitled “Cameralism, Leibniz, […]

by June 14, 2021 0 comments History, News
A photograph of the First Decoration Day, May 30, 1868.

Memorial Day and the Road to Reconciliation

By Edward and Nancy Spannaus May 30, 2021—In his Second Inaugural Address, which occurred only 41 days before his assassination, President Abraham Lincoln concluded with an appeal for bringing the nation together: With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to […]

by May 30, 2021 0 comments Commentary, History